I have picked up a few 1950s FLINT US Stainless Steel Utensils lately.  Decades of constant washing and drying and exposure to the minerals causes plastic handles to roughen up and look beaten.  This type of plastic is pretty indestructible otherwise.  The rough surface can be sanded smooth or even burnished with steel wool and more »

Usually I just give my 1990 Kitchenaid a good wipe down everytime I use it. But I took this occassion to break down both mine and my mother’s 2001 machine and clean all the nooks and crannies.  Aside from dishtowels and a good antibacterial spray,  you need a scrub brush to get into all the more »

I have been wondering what to do about vessels where the cracks go all the way through to the inside.  So I am running an experiment on this Vintage bean pot.   Burnham and Morrill, of B&M baked beans, used to sell their beans in grocery stores in crocks; eventually switching to cans, though they do more »

I simply can’t remember where I found this charming little bread knife…though know I didn’t pay much for it. I can’t pin down the exact date, but I am pretty certain it’s at least 100 years old. The remarkable thing is that the bolster and blade are still tight in the handle. It was also more »

My mother asked me for a ice cream disher but the new ones aren’t a patch on the vintage ones. So I picked up a couple of the old style Hamilton Beach soda fountain dishers. One of them needed a little paint and polish to bring it back into the ice cream ball game. Sadly more »

I found this blackened earthenware dish hiding in a corner of an antique shop. It screamed rescue me. And it took almost not time at all to turn it from a eyestore into the centerpiece of my bread baking universe. It is surprising what you can do with a little baking soda, a nail brush more »

When I picked up this Kitchenaid 3.5 qt Dutch Oven it had this cast on the finish. None of my LeCruset or other Enameled cast iron had every developed this.   When I researched it, I didn’t find anything that addressed this singular issue. I do think it was caused by repeatedly putting it in the more »

I have had this dear little painted recipe box for ages. Unfortunately it has a layer of grime over it’s green finish. How to clean that layer off without harming the paint or the decal turned out to be surprisingly easy. Using clean dishcloths and a little baking soda and water, the grime was easily more »

I picked up this Cartson Pewter (Freeport Pennsylvania) Pewter charger (that’s the underplate for a dinner plate) and it had this stubborn stain on it. Pewter is metal alloy, traditionally composed of 85–99% tin and is not as reactive a metal as aluminum. The stain survived quite a bit of washing, even some elbow grease more »

The Jacob Bromwell Flour sifter – iconic, insanely perfectly designed device. So perfect in fact, it has 100 imitators. Invented in 1926 by Thomas G Melish for the Bromwell Wire Goods Company, it is still being made in Indiana today by the Jacob Bromwell company. Although a flour sifter is no longer a required item more »