I simply can’t remember where I found this charming little bread knife…though know I didn’t pay much for it. I can’t pin down the exact date, but I am pretty certain it’s at least 100 years old.

The remarkable thing is that the bolster and blade are still tight in the handle. It was also still sharp enough to cut bread with.

All I have to do is clean it well enough to use on food. Unlike carving blades, this serrated blade is very flexible almost like a fillet knife. 

 

First I went over it with #000 steel wool and Barkeepers friend, and then went to #400 sand paper and WD-40 and finally Simichrome and a rag for a polish.

I decided that I didn’t want it to look ‘brand’ new.  I want it to still look old, there are only a couple of spots of corrosion that I can ignore.

The bolster had some sort of strange shellac on it, which took some elbow grease.

I also decided I wanted to keep the handle looking just the way it is with the black paint half on and the oak grain visible. So no stripping and no painting, just a polish with beeswax/mineral spirits polish. This knife will rarely if ever get washed, so the handle is safe from further damage.

It actually slices tomatoes way better than my old Henckles which because of it’s serration I never could sharpen properly.

The Hudson Knife’s serrations are straight and beveled on both sides and can actually be sharpened on a whet stone. Go figure.

Looks like I have a new favorite toy.

 

 

 

 

 

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